221 free CV templates in Microsoft Word | Page 5

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Latest CV templates:

Free Narrow Lilac CV/résumé template in Word

A neat and tidy CV or résumé that uses the attractive Letter Gothic Std font and subtle lilac details for emphasis. A subtle dotted border, attractive headings and a very simple layout make this a great choice for any role.

Free pharmacist CV/résumé template example

A well organised CV or résumé template that has been completed for a pharmacist, ideal to adapt for those applying for pharmacy roles. The easy-to-edit simple two-column layout puts the focus on your information.

Free admin assistant CV/résumé example

A great example CV or résumé that has been completed for an Administrative Assistant role. The basic two-column style puts the focus firmly on your information. A perfect template to inspire your own CV or résumé.

Free typeface Résumé Template (version 3)

Another version of our popular typeface CV or résumé template that uses the Courier New font with a broken border. The simple design with a single column layout and section dividers makes your details easy to read.

Free school leavers CV template

A free Microsoft Word school leavers CV template ideal for recent graduates with headings to suit. This basic layout provides you with the core sections you need for your first CV. Download and customise with your info.

College graduate CV template

This clean, simple CV template has space for your personal profile and activities, giving you the opportunity to tell your would-be employer more about yourself. All the core sections are included in a basic layout.

Functional grey CV template

This very basic and functional free CV or resume Word template features grey boxes to highlight the different core sections and a simple bold header. Download and customise to meet your own needs and requirements.

Written Headers CV/résumé template

A touch of handwriting using the Bradley Hand ITC font gives this CV or résumé template a more informal feel, but the neat sections and printed details keep it professional. Core sections and a single column layout.

Well Drawn CV/résumé template

There’s a slightly hand drawn feel to this neat résumé template with its boxy border and use of the Chaparrel Pro Light font. An informal template best suited to more relaxed roles, such as childcare or nursing.

Typeface CV/résumé template

Using the Kaiti font, this CV or résumé template looks like it’s straight off the printing press. Very simple in design with soft lilac accents, dividing lines and a simple layout that keeps the focus on your information.

Smart soft green themed résumé template

A gentle green chunky border and soft green headings, coupled with a bold choice of font make for a subtle well designed CV or résumé template. Dividing lines and bulleted lists help to present your info effectively.

Simple sage CV/résumé template

The choice of Segoe UI font, simple double sage green border and attractive light green headings add subtle detail to this attractive résumé or CV. A simple layout with all the core sections to set you on the right track.

Secretary themed résumé template

A fabulous typewriter key heading and a ‘typeface’ font gives this brilliant CV or résumé template a quirky feel, perfect for secretarial or administrative job applications. Space for an optional photo is also included.

Sage Green CV/résumé template

Smart sage green headings, lines and a simple border add interest to this clean and simple CV or résumé template that is ideal for a multitude of roles. A neat two-column design that presents your information effectively.

Retro orange CV/résumé template

This CV or résumé template has just a touch of retro – its titles are in the Bauhaus 93 font & it uses a seventies orange for the headers and border. Smart dividers and a two-column header help present your details neatly.

Purple flair CV/résumé template

This template is a twist on our purple flair résumé template with the Lucida Console font for a typewriter finish. Soft purple borders, centred purple headings and italics are used to neatly divided up your details.

Pieced together CV/résumé template

Using the MMa Textbook font, this intriguing résumé reminds us a little of a ransom note but with plenty of styling to keep it smart and professional. It’s a unique and eye-catching design with an optional photo.

Neat orange résumé template

Using Bookman Old Style font, this is a neat and tidy two page résumé template that uses orange for a splash of eye-catching colour. Two columns are used for the header, with the rest of the content in a single column.

Neatly Written résumé template

A black & grey ‘handwritten’ CV or résumé template that uses a writing font & a boxy grey border. The font choice is of course optional & you can use this template to simply prompt you to fill out the core sections.

Basic résumé template

Our most basic CV or résumé template with plenty of sections for all of your information. Having a simple template to start with prompts to help you fill everything in correctly, in the proper reverse chronological order.

Make an Impact CV/résumé template

Bold headings in the IMPACT font pack a punch with this clean, crisp & attractive CV or résumé template, free to download & customise. The template helps ensure you complete all the core sections in the right order.

Headliner CV/résumé template

Britannic Bold headers give this sharp black & white résumé template a touch of movie glamour, without distracting from your core strengths and skills. An otherwise simple layout that uses spacing to split up your details.

Handwritten CV/résumé template

Using a very convincing handwriting font, this neat easy-to-read and clutter-free résumé or CV template is perfect for a multitude of job applications where an informal and friendly approach is required.

Three reasons your CV is being rejected

Most people who apply for a job are capable of performing well. They have the skills and experience required to succeed in the role, but they fail at the first hurdle. The problem is that most job seekers don’t know how to write a winning CV, and fail to get that message across.

To avoid rejection, you need to consider some very important points. Here are three reasons your CV is being rejected and what you can do about it.

1. It’s too generic

One of the main reasons why an employer has to reject so many CVs is because the job seeker fails to prove why they should be hired. It is the job of the CV writer to present the right information, and not the job of the hiring manager to have to find it.

Far too many CVs offer everything the job seeker has done and can do, but that isn’t what the employer is looking for. When the hiring manager picks up a CV they want to see how that person fits into the role and the company. Do they have the right skills? Do they have the right qualifications? Have they got any direct work experience? Are there any transferable skills?

Top tip: the employer doesn’t want your entire career history!

So rather than write what is called a ‘generic CV’ you should instead take a more ‘tailored’ approach. Writing only one CV might seem like the normal thing to do, but we can confirm that it isn’t – unless you are only applying for one job of course! You need to write a new CV each and every time you apply – even if the role is the same.

Why should I write a new CV for each employer?

Every employer is different, and it’s your job as the CV writer to recognise their unique differences and write a CV accordingly. Start with the job advert and the skills, experience and qualifications requested. Your aim is to try and match the requirements as closely as possible, and leave everything else out (if possible). This doesn’t mean that you remove everything that isn’t relevant, and instead focus and expand upon what’s important.

By tailoring your CV to the job specification you are more likely to get through to the interview stage. The employer will be impressed that you have taken the time and initiative to read the job advert and recognise their needs. Not only that, but you’ve proven that you are the right person for the job.

2. It contains a mistake

Did you know that the most popular reason why a CV is rejected is because of a spelling mistake? It’s true, and whilst it would be easy to assume that your word processing software will catch any spelling or grammatical errors, you’d be wrong!

You cannot rely on your laptop to correct mistakes, and your own diligence will be far more successful. This doesn’t mean to say you shouldn’t press the ‘spell checker’ button, but in addition you should check it yourself.

Why do employers reject CVs from one little mistake?

Even though you may think it’s harsh to reject a candidate because of one small spelling mistake, it is actually quite understandable. The employer is looking for someone who is diligent, accurate, and professional. A spelling mistake demonstrates that the job seeker is none of the above, otherwise the mistake wouldn’t be there!

Get someone else to check your CV before you apply, as that will further guarantee an error free application. Don’t forget that a ‘CV error’ also comes down to your layout, spacing, font style and size, and anything else related to presentation. Everything needs to be perfect!

3. There are no performance indicators

Let’s face it, anyone can write a CV that lists the skills required – but that doesn’t mean to say they are still good at their job. The employer is looking for two main things when they read a CV:

  1. Have they got the skills and qualifications required?
  2. Can or will they perform well in the role?

Don’t fall into the trap of simply listing all your skills. The employer wants to know that you have a proven track record, and that you can ‘walk the walk’. Providing an indication of your past performances is just as important as listing your credentials.

How can I prove I can do what I say to a high level?

Proving to the employer that you are a great catch requires you to be bold in your CV. Don’t be shy about your achievements, and let them know how great you are with actual facts. What you write on your CV will greatly depend on your chosen career. Here are a few examples of what you could use:

  • Revenue
  • Sales
  • Targets met
  • Patients cared for
  • Customer service examples
  • Accolades – rewards, awards and internal competitions
  • Stats, figures, charts, graphs
  • Portfolio of your work – physical or online

Popular CV layouts:

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220 free CV templates in Microsoft Word Overall rating: 4.4 out of 5 based on 3673 reviews.

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